CrossFit South Rockland

Monday, April 30, 2018

4/30 Day#8


Partner Pacing Warm up#1
5x
30:30
Single unders 
(Maintain same reps throughout) 

5x 
50:10
25m shuttles
(Maintain same reps throughout)

Skill
Pacing

WOD
For time:
600m run
150 double unders
20 burpees
*10 minute time cap


Sunday, April 29, 2018

This Is What Happens to Your Body When You Stop Exercising



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MISSING CDC EMPLOYEE TIMOTHY CUNNINGHAM FOUND DEAD TWO MONTHS AFTER HE VANISHED
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By MARIA MASTERS / HEALTH.COM
October 20, 2016
TIME Health
For more, visit 
TIME Health.

There comes a point in almost every 
fitness lover’s life when they consider throwing in the towel after a workout—both figuratively and literally. Blame it on your looming work deadlines, or the stubborn needle on the scale, or even just plain old boredom.

That’s normal. But here’s why you shouldn’t follow through on the temptation to just quit: There are plenty of benefits to exercise, but they’re not permanent. In fact, many of those hard-earned gains will start to disappear in as little as two weeks, says Farah Hameed, MD, a sports medicine physician with ColumbiaDoctors.

Here’s exactly what you can expect to happen to your body if you give up exercise:

Within 10 days: Your brain might start to change

For years, researchers have suspected that exercise is good for your brain, too—according to one 2013 review, it might be able to 
help offset age-related memory loss. Now, a new study in the journal Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience found that even a short vacation from your workout might cause changes to the brain.

In the study, when a group of long-term endurance runners took a 10-day exercise hiatus, their subsequent MRIs showed a reduction in blood flow to the 
hippocampus, the part of the brain that’s associated with memory and emotion. The researchers point out that although the runners didn’t experience any cognitive changes over the period, more long-term studies are needed.
Within two weeks: Your endurance will plummet and your vitals may spike

After just 14 days, you might have a harder time climbing a flight of stairs or keeping up with your colleagues during the monthly kickball game. The reason you’re so winded? Skipping sweat sessions causes a drop in your 
VO2 max, or the maximum amount of oxygen your body can use. It can dip by about 10% after two weeks, says Dr. Hameed. It only gets worse from there: After four weeks, your VO2 max can drop by about 15%, and after three months, it can fall about 20%—“and those are conservative estimates,” Dr. Hameed notes.

Staying even slightly active can help: One 2009 study found that male kayakers who took a five-week break from their training 
saw an 11.3% drop on average in their VO2 max, while those who worked in a handful of exercise sessions during each week only saw a 5.6% drop.


Health.com: 
11 Fitness Foods to Help You Get in Shape Faster

Even if you don’t notice a change in your speed or strength, you might experience a sharp rise in your blood pressure and blood glucose levels—something that could be more serious for people with diabetes or high blood pressure, says Dr. Hameed.

Researchers from South Africa found that a two-week exercise break was enough to offset the blood pressure benefits of two weeks of high-intensity interval training; another 2015 study in the Journal of Applied Physiology found that people who did an eight-month bout of resistance and aerobic exercise saw an improvement in the blood glucose levels, but lost almost half of these benefits after 14 days of inactivity.

Health.com: 
20 Ways to Lower Your Blood Pressure Naturally

Within four weeks: Your strength will start slipping

Dr. Hameed estimates that some people will notice their strength declining after about two weeks of inactivity, while others will begin to see a difference after about four weeks. The silver lining: Our strength probably diminishes at a slower rate than our endurance, and one 2011 study in the 
Journal of Strength and Conditioning found that when one group of men stopped doing resistance training, they still had some of their strength gains up to 24 weeks later.
Within eight weeks: You might gain fat

Dr. Hameed estimates that people will start to notice a physical change—either by looking in the mirror, or at the number on the scale—after about six weeks. Even elite athletes aren’t immune to the rebound.


A 2012 study in the Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research found that competitive swimmers who took a five-week break from their training experienced a 12% increase in their levels of body fat, and saw a boost in their body weight and waist circumference. (We should also point out that these athletes weren’t totally sedentary—they still did some light and moderate exercise.) And a 2016 study found that elite Taekwondo athletes who took an eight-week hiatus from exercise experienced an increase in their levels of body fat and a decrease in muscle mass, too.

4/29 Day#7 Motivation

Saturday, April 28, 2018

4/28 Day#6 Hero Saturday

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Alex Viola, 29, was killed Nov. 17, 2013, in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan, from wounds caused by an improvised explosive device. Originally from Keller, Texas, Viola was an engineer assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 7th Special Forces Group at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. He was awarded numerous awards for his service, including the Army Achievement Medal, the National Defense Service Medal, the Army Good Conduct Medal, the Global War on Terrorism Service Medal and the Army Service Ribbon.
Viola traveled often and worked out at many CrossFit affiliates. Some of his favorite movements were pull-ups, power snatches and power cleans. He also enjoyed running.
Viola is survived by his parents, Margaret and Frank; and his sister, Christina.


Warm up
Barbell complex 1 & 2
#1- Deadlift/ Hang power clean/ Front squat/ Press/ Thruster

#2- Snatch grip deadlift/ Hang power snatch/ OHS/ Full snatch

Skill
Power snatches and power cleans

WOD
Viola
20 minutes AMRAP
Run 400 meters
11 power snatches w/65# m/95#
17 pull ups
13 power cleans w/65# m/95#

Friday, April 27, 2018

4/27 Day#5


Gymnastic Progression Warm up 
Round 1: Squat, push-up, sit-up, pull-up (strict), back extension

Round 2: Lunge, dip (strict), V-up, kipping pull-up, hip extension

Round 3: Pistol, handstand push-up, toe to bar (straight leg and strict), muscle-up
(strict), hip and back extension

Skill
Weighted dips

WOD
Weighted dips
5-4-3-2-1


Thursday, April 26, 2018

4/26 Day#4


Warm up & Skill
ARE squat complex
2x
Regular elevated 3x with 3 second hold
Heels elevated 3x with 3 second hold  
Toes elevated 3x with 3 second hold 
Regular elevated 3x with 3 second hold

OHS

WOD
A-5x 3 
OHS

B-Nancy
5 rounds for time:
400m run
15 OHS w/65 m/95

GoFit
Posterior Chain Warm up
400m run

Dead bug complex

Plank complex

Skill
KBS & KB squat

WOD
5x
20:40
-Battle rope
-KBS
-Air bike
-KB squats


Wednesday, April 25, 2018

Health benefits of pineapple




The word "pineapple," derived from the Spanish word piƱa, was first used in 1398 to refer to a pinecone. This changed about 300 years later, with the word "pinecone" being introduced so pineapple could be used exclusively for the fruit. Pineapples were discovered by Europeans in 1493 on the Caribbean island of Guadalupe. Early attempts by Europeans to cultivate the fruit failed until they realized that the fruit needs a tropical climate to flourish. By the end of the 16th century, Portuguese and Spanish explorers introduced pineapples into their Asian, African and South Pacific colonies. Because pineapples are very perishable, fresh pineapples were a rarity for early American colonists. Glazed, sugar-coated pineapples were a luxurious treat, and fresh pineapple itself became a symbol of prestige and social class. Pineapples were first cultivated in Hawaii in the 18th century. Hawaii is the only U.S. state in which they are still grown. 

Pineapples are tropical fruit that are rich in vitamins, enzymes and antioxidants. They may help boost the immune system, build strong bones and aid indigestion. Also, despite their sweetness, they are low in calories. Pineapples are members of the bromeliad family, and one of the few bromeliads to produce edible fruit, according to the biology department at Union County College. The fruit is actually made of many individual berries that fuse together around a central core. Each pineapple scale is an individual berry.

Pineapple Nutrition

Pineapples are a storehouse of several health benefits due to their nutrients. They contain bromelain, protein, carbohydrates, sugar, and soluble and insoluble dietary fiber. The vitamins in these fruits include vitamin A, vitamin C, beta-carotene, thiamin, vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid), vitamin B6, and folate. Minerals like potassium, copper, manganese, calcium, sodium, and magnesium are also found in pineapples. These tropical fruits are low in calories and are, therefore, a major part of weight loss diets.


Health Benefits of Pineapple  


1.    Rich Source of Immune Boosting Vitamin C
Pineapple has a whopping 131 percent of your daily value of antioxidant Vitamin C! As an antioxidant it has the ability to synthesize collagen, which is the main protein in the body responsible for maintaining healthy blood vessels and organs. The vitamin C that is found in pineapple can also help skin problems, like a sunburn or dried and irritated skin.
2.    High in Fiber
Being that one medium pineapple contains about 13 grams of fiber, eating pineapple is a great way to maximize these health benefits. Because of its high fiber content, one of the benefits of pineapple is that it can help to prevent constipation and will promote regularity and a healthy digestive tract.
3.    Improves Fertility
Studies show that eating foods that are rich in antioxidants can help prevent infertility.Because free radicals can damage the reproductive system, foods with high antioxidant activity like pineapples that battle these free radicals are recommended for people who are trying to conceive.
The antioxidants in pineapple, such as vitamin C, beta-carotene and the other vitamins and minerals that are present, including copper, affect both male and female fertility. Antioxidants have been shown to help increase blood flow and restore proper tissue formation in the genital organs, plus they can assist in boosting sperm count.
4.    Protects Against Cardiovascular Disease
Pineapple supports heart health because of its fiber, potassium and vitamin C content. One study found that one of the benefits of pineapple juice if that it has cardio-protective abilities, as seen in studies done on rats. The study concluded that pineapple juice can reduce the risk of coronary heart disease and can help establish digestion and absorption.
High potassium intakes are also associated with a reduced risk of stroke, protection against loss of muscle mass, preservation of bone mineral density and reduction in the formation of kidney stones. 
Fruits that are high in potassium can also help with lowering high blood pressure.Pineapple helps to reduce dangerous inflammation and restore healthy blood pressure due to its beneficial antioxidants.
Pineapple also helps improve heart health because of the effects of powerful bromelain, which can fight blood clotting and is nature’s answer to those taking an aspirin a day to lower the risk of heart attack. 
5.    Prevents Asthma
The beta-carotene that is found in plant foods like pineapple helps to lower the risk of developing asthma. Toxins, poor nutrition, pollution, antibiotic abuse and stress play a large role in the development of asthma. All of these factors cause inflammation, but luckily one of the benefits of pineapple is that it can help to reduce through its detoxifying capabilities.
6.    Helps Mental Health
Another one of the benefits of pineapple is that it helps improve your mood and helps fight depression and anxiety. Pineapple is a good source of the amino acid tryptophan, which is used by the body to produce enough serotonin, one of our main “happy hormones.” Consuming enough of this amino acid, in addition to other nutrients like B vitamins, is important to support your neurological system, for energy, and for the production of good mood hormones.
7.    Helps Fight Cancer
In 2007, researchers published a groundbreaking article in the Plant Medical Journal about pineapple’s bromelain being found to be far more effective than the traditional chemo-agent used in the treatment of cancer.
In tests treating cancer in animals, bromelain was found to be more effective than 5-fluoracil (5-FU) when compared to an untreated control group. 5-FU has been used in the treatment of cancer for over 40 years, but its main problem is that it kills or irreversibly damages healthy cells and tissue as well as cancerous ones.
Bromelain was not only found to be more effective but was also many times safer than 5-FU. Natural compounds, such as bromelain, have selective cytotoxity and they are able to kill cancerous cells in a self-disassembly process called apoptosis, while leaving healthy cells unharmed.
8.    Reduces Inflammation
The benefits of pineapple include the ability to help those suffering from arthritis and joint pain because the bromelain that is present can speed up healing associated with surgical procedures. It is also very useful for treating sporting injuries including sprains and can help counter pain.
9.    Aids in Digestion
For digestion, eating pineapple serves as a powerful aid in breaking down proteins into peptides and amino acids. It can ease the symptoms of ulcerative colitis, acid reflux, and it helps the general digestive processes. It’s also useful in helping to prevent autoimmune responses due to common food allergies.
10. Treats Cough and Cold
Pineapple is rich in both bromelain and vitamin C, therefore it helps in preventing and treating respiratory illnesses while eliminating phlegm and mucus from your body if you’ve already contracted an illness or infection. These two nutrients are connected with the reduction of phlegm and mucus build up in the respiratory tracts and sinus cavities.
11. Improves Bone Health
Pineapple contains an impressive amount of manganese. Manganese is a trace mineral essential for the strengthening of bones as well as their growth and repair. It is the most prominent mineral in pineapple, and a single serving can provide you with more than 70% of your daily requirement of this mineral.
12.  Improves Oral Health
Along with the antioxidants that protect against oral cancer, pineapple also has astringent properties, which strengthen gums and teeth. Pineapple is a very powerful astringent and is often prescribed as a natural remedy to fix the loosening of teeth or the retraction of gums. Astringent agents help tighten up tissues and tone the body so that tooth loss, hair loss, muscle weakness, and skin loosening do not occur.
13.  Improves Vision
Pineapple has the ability to improve eye health and prevent other age-related eye diseases. Macular degeneration affects many elderly people and beta-carotene present in pineapple can help prevent this vision problem.
14.  Dissolves Kidney Stones
By regulating digestion and reducing blood clotting, pineapples help in dissolving kidney stones. Eat the bromelain-rich fruit or drink its juice to keep the kidneys safe and stones away!
Fun Tip: If you are planning to consume a pineapple, cut the crown and keep the fruit in the fridge placing it upside down. Generally, the sweetness settles at the bottom of the fruit and this will help in distributing it throughout the pineapple.

By: Nataliya Olifer


References: